When should you use Scrum vs Kanban?

Uncover when to use Scrum vs Kanban, when to choose Kanban for complex projects, and why switching to Kanban could be beneficial. This article offers detailed insights.

When should you use Scrum vs Kanban?

Use scrum if disciplined planning at regular intervals is required. No provision for planning the work. Teams adopt their own cadence and approach to planning. User kanban planning can be intermittent or on an as-needed basis.

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When should a team choose Kanban over Scrum for a complex project?

Unlike Scrum, Kanban is better suited for projects without a significant feature or product backlog (also known as a sprint backlog). Kanban teams excel at quickly burning through small tasks as they arise.

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On what parameters or reasoning you will decide to go with Kanban vs Scrum?

Having their process on a Kanban board makes improving workflow efficiency and minimizing waste continuously easy. Scrum works best in scenarios with time-boxed iterations when projects have fixed deadlines and requirements.

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When should I switch to Kanban?

Maybe the team is close to customer support. Maybe the team has many products to support in production. Maybe the team’s work consists of refactoring and bug fixing. These kinds of external factors that make work unforecastable are solid grounds for considering the move to Kanban.

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What would be the best reason to choose Kanban over Scrum?

Scrum is a prescriptive framework that requires detailed planning — it has clearly defined processes and roles. Kanban is more flexible with the main goal of limiting work-in-progress bottlenecks.

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Why to replace Scrum with Kanban?

Scrum vs Kanban: Key Metrics Scrum utilizes metrics such as velocity, burn-down charts, and sprint burndown to track progress and measure team performance. These metrics provide insights into the team’s efficiency and help with future planning. Kanban emphasizes metrics such as cycle time, lead time, and throughput.

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